Diva Wisdom Diva Wisdom

Diva Wisdom
30 Sep 2015

This book falls into five parts. The first details Jane’s background. In the second and third Jane shares, in her words: “what she knows for sure”. Part four is Jane’s take on sisterhood, superwoman and sexism, while in the final part Jane discusses the challenges that face the next generation of women.

The first theme that emerges is the importance of emotional resilience, both in business and in life in general. In her typically combative style, she criticises our risk-averse society, pointing out that if you don’t take risks you can’t know your own limits and, while not all ventures will be successful, some of life’s biggest lessons come from adversity and failure.

The second theme is the need to embrace a “fix yourself first” approach. Here Jane calls on her experiences as a coach and goes on to discuss how “self-belief and self-love are the keys to a meaningful life”. Jane shares many personal insights on how all of life’s adventures can be reframed to encourage personal growth and development.

Jane reserves part three of the book to detail how the world will change when we create more female entrepreneurs. Jane has coached lots of women and believes that there are several common themes that prevent women from reaching their full potential.

Having discussed the obstacles, Jane details her solutions, centred on choosing your niche and building your brand. But most of all you need passion and it is clear that this book is written with passion.

The subject of Jane’s first book: “superwoman, her sell by date has expired” is revisited in section four of this book.

In section five, Jane asserts that our young girls are in crisis and need role models other than celebrities. Not only has Jane devoted the final part of this book to this issue, she has dedicated the past five years to Girls Out Loud, a social enterprise she founded to support teenage girls.

We come full circle in the book as Jane asserts that: “academic prowess is no substitute for emotional resilience”. The statistics Jane quotes are genuinely troubling and Jane is particularly vocal in the chapter, decrying the early sexualisation of girls, not only in how they are expected to look but how they are expected to behave.

Jane pulls no punches blaming the media and the internet for keeping women in their place and stealing the innocence of children. In summary, this is a very personal book. Most people have experiences very similar to Jane’s and, by sharing her solutions to the problems, Jane helps others to find their own answers.

Some experiences are more individual and by sharing these Jane sheds light on how complex, emotionally charged problems, can be tackled. Everyone will be able to take something from Jane’s journey.

By Jane Kenyon

Reviewed by Karen Birch, chair of Glasgow Women’s Library.

This book falls into five parts. The first details Jane’s background. In the second and third Jane shares, in her words: “what she knows for sure”. Part four is Jane’s take on sisterhood, superwoman and sexism, while in the final part Jane discusses the challenges that face the next generation of women.

The first theme that emerges is the importance of emotional resilience, both in business and in life in general. In her typically combative style, she criticises our risk-averse society, pointing out that if you don’t take risks you can’t know your own limits and, while not all ventures will be successful, some of life’s biggest lessons come from adversity and failure.

The second theme is the need to embrace a “fix yourself first” approach. Here Jane calls on her experiences as a coach and goes on to discuss how “self-belief and self-love are the keys to a meaningful life”. Jane shares many personal insights on how all of life’s adventures can be reframed to encourage personal growth and development.

Jane reserves part three of the book to detail how the world will change when we create more female entrepreneurs. Jane has coached lots of women and believes that there are several common themes that prevent women from reaching their full potential.

Having discussed the obstacles, Jane details her solutions, centred on choosing your niche and building your brand. But most of all you need passion and it is clear that this book is written with passion.

The subject of Jane’s first book: “superwoman, her sell by date has expired” is revisited in section four of this book.

In section five, Jane asserts that our young girls are in crisis and need role models other than celebrities. Not only has Jane devoted the final part of this book to this issue, she has dedicated the past five years to Girls Out Loud, a social enterprise she founded to support teenage girls.

We come full circle in the book as Jane asserts that: “academic prowess is no substitute for emotional resilience”. The statistics Jane quotes are genuinely troubling and Jane is particularly vocal in the chapter, decrying the early sexualisation of girls, not only in how they are expected to look but how they are expected to behave.

Jane pulls no punches blaming the media and the internet for keeping women in their place and stealing the innocence of children. In summary, this is a very personal book. Most people have experiences very similar to Jane’s and, by sharing her solutions to the problems, Jane helps others to find their own answers.

Some experiences are more individual and by sharing these Jane sheds light on how complex, emotionally charged problems, can be tackled. Everyone will be able to take something from Jane’s journey.

By Jane Kenyon

Reviewed by Karen Birch, chair of Glasgow Women’s Library.