Emotional Intelligence @work Emotional Intelligence @work

Emotional Intelligence @work
31 Aug 2014

By Jolyon Maddocks

Emotional Intelligence @work explains how to make change sustainable by addressing the underlying attitudes that underpin a person’s thinking and feeling that then drive their behaviour, habits and performance

Making a change can be difficult. All too often, an individual will gradually revert back to their old ways of feeling, thinking and behaving after developmental coaching or inspirational training.

Emotional intelligence (EI) is the art of looking at personality traits and intelligence (which are relatively fixed) and competencies (that are relatively short-lived). Emotional Intelligence @work provides a fresh perspective on EI, based upon latest brain science research and puts attitudes at the heart of achieving enduring change.

The book is divided into three accessible parts. Each section of the book builds on the last, leading the reader from a detailed explanation of EI, its underlying neuroscience and how it fits into the structure of human personality. It does this through a thorough exploration of the emotional intelligence profile (EIP) and each of its elements.

Jolyon Maddocks explains, not only how the EIP is constructed, but how to interpret each of the individual scales and how each interrelates with the others creating an immensely insightful and valuable tool.

The first sections of the book are largely theoretical and the last section is where Maddocks really gives his model some practical context, allowing the reader to see how the tool can be applied in both a coaching and business context to aid personal development.

Advice is also given on how the EIP questionnaire can be used to develop EI and on turning an individual’s personality potential into effective and sustainable performance, something which Maddocks believes is fundamental to leadership effectiveness and success in business.

Overall, the book is great for existing coaches. It is easy to read and provides a grasp of the psychological theory of EI and the core meaning of each of the sixteen EIP scales as well as a comprehensive toolkit for putting EI into practice.

 

Review contributed by Ethan Schutz, president and CEO of The Schutz Company.

By Jolyon Maddocks

Emotional Intelligence @work explains how to make change sustainable by addressing the underlying attitudes that underpin a person’s thinking and feeling that then drive their behaviour, habits and performance

Making a change can be difficult. All too often, an individual will gradually revert back to their old ways of feeling, thinking and behaving after developmental coaching or inspirational training.

Emotional intelligence (EI) is the art of looking at personality traits and intelligence (which are relatively fixed) and competencies (that are relatively short-lived). Emotional Intelligence @work provides a fresh perspective on EI, based upon latest brain science research and puts attitudes at the heart of achieving enduring change.

The book is divided into three accessible parts. Each section of the book builds on the last, leading the reader from a detailed explanation of EI, its underlying neuroscience and how it fits into the structure of human personality. It does this through a thorough exploration of the emotional intelligence profile (EIP) and each of its elements.

Jolyon Maddocks explains, not only how the EIP is constructed, but how to interpret each of the individual scales and how each interrelates with the others creating an immensely insightful and valuable tool.

The first sections of the book are largely theoretical and the last section is where Maddocks really gives his model some practical context, allowing the reader to see how the tool can be applied in both a coaching and business context to aid personal development.

Advice is also given on how the EIP questionnaire can be used to develop EI and on turning an individual’s personality potential into effective and sustainable performance, something which Maddocks believes is fundamental to leadership effectiveness and success in business.

Overall, the book is great for existing coaches. It is easy to read and provides a grasp of the psychological theory of EI and the core meaning of each of the sixteen EIP scales as well as a comprehensive toolkit for putting EI into practice.

 

Review contributed by Ethan Schutz, president and CEO of The Schutz Company.