Pitch Up! Pitch Up!

Pitch Up!
30 Sep 2014

The author Paul Boross, is known as the ‘pitch doctor’, helping professionals to perfect their pitching skills. In this, his third book, he has turned his experience of pitching to the task of pitching in a career context, perhaps at a job interview, at a networking event, or anywhere that you want to make the most of an opportunity to impress someone and make sure you’re in the frame for the job.

Many career development books try to cover the entire job hunting process, whereas the approach and advice of Pitch Up! is very focused and direct. Your suitability for the job, qualifications and experience are not in question.

We can certainly think of job candidates who, on paper, were a perfect fit, only to find that they failed to perform. On the other hand, there are people who did not have the best CV but excelled in the job because of their attitude.

The author assumes that you apply for a job because you have what you need to succeed in the selection process. Where you are most likely to stumble is in your ability to communicate that experience and value to the interviewer.

The book covers such topics as personal branding, making the right first impression, the correct use of social media, networking and of course the interview pitch itself. It even covers how to pitch for a pay rise or promotion for readers who are now established in a new role.

Overall, this book is simple and practical. It’s easy to follow and implement and while some of the ideas might seem risky to the conservative candidate in today’s cut-throat job market, anything that gives you an edge has to be worth trying.

 

 

The author Paul Boross, is known as the ‘pitch doctor’, helping professionals to perfect their pitching skills. In this, his third book, he has turned his experience of pitching to the task of pitching in a career context, perhaps at a job interview, at a networking event, or anywhere that you want to make the most of an opportunity to impress someone and make sure you’re in the frame for the job.

Many career development books try to cover the entire job hunting process, whereas the approach and advice of Pitch Up! is very focused and direct. Your suitability for the job, qualifications and experience are not in question.

We can certainly think of job candidates who, on paper, were a perfect fit, only to find that they failed to perform. On the other hand, there are people who did not have the best CV but excelled in the job because of their attitude.

The author assumes that you apply for a job because you have what you need to succeed in the selection process. Where you are most likely to stumble is in your ability to communicate that experience and value to the interviewer.

The book covers such topics as personal branding, making the right first impression, the correct use of social media, networking and of course the interview pitch itself. It even covers how to pitch for a pay rise or promotion for readers who are now established in a new role.

Overall, this book is simple and practical. It’s easy to follow and implement and while some of the ideas might seem risky to the conservative candidate in today’s cut-throat job market, anything that gives you an edge has to be worth trying.