How to Present to Absolutely Anyone How to Present to Absolutely Anyone

How to Present to Absolutely Anyone
06 Feb 2019

For some, the prospect of giving a presentation can feel something akin to a near-death experience. Indeed, some people will do whatever they can to avoid it.

So the author is to be applauded for his efforts in making presentations feel do-able. There is even a salesperson-style of optimism evident in some parts of the book.

Page 42, for example, suggests a pitch that results in a “no” is merely an unplanned outcome rather than a rejection. But he overlooks alternative approaches to staying optimistic, for instance, considering each rejection as being a step closer to someone saying “yes”, which is arguably more motivational.

In the first half of his work in particular, Mark Rhodes makes good use of established Neuro Linguistic Programming methods to reframe situations and attitudes. He also succeeds in building a sense of confidence as the book progresses, which reflects well on the writer – it makes you feel good as you work through it. The book is likewise peppered with short stories and anecdotes, which keep it entertaining.

Essential skills

But if there is a criticism, it is that there is too much focus on the writer’s experience of making motivational pitches to sales people. The need to know your subject well, be able to answer questions of a technical nature, present to a range of different audiences, understand different cultural issues and offer various types of presentations, are all rich seams, which – if explored - would have given the book a deeper perspective. It would also have been more relevant and useful to a larger number of readers.

To state (on page 169) that if you are unable to answer a question, simply “do a quick Google search on your phone at the break” hints at an ability to bluff rather than ensure you know what you are talking about - and anyone giving a presentation with that advice in mind is treading on thin ice. Still, it probably works at times.

The inclusion of a section on getting paid for making presentations underlines the book’s approach about making presentations for the sake of making presentations. But it overlooks that being able to present is an essential work skill in its own right, and that the challenges involved affect everyone, whether they are paid extra for doing it or not.

Any potential purchasers might be interested to know that additional videos by the author are available on YouTube and that they sometimes cover ground not included in the book – for example, the need to pace things slowly lest you run out of oxygen. Clearly the author, as experienced as he obviously is, is still on a learning curve.

But there is no doubt that this work conveys an element of enthusiasm and excitement, which - without becoming overzealous or righteous – brings a certain freshness to this often overlooked, but essential, skill.

 Mark Northway

Mark Northway is director and courses co-ordinator at Deltic Training, which provides strategic administration and business management courses and accredited qualifications. He is a former director and trustee of the Institute of Administrative Management (IAM), a chief IAM examiner and a Princes Trust Award winner for his role in business mentoring in the UK.

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How to overcome your fear of public speaking

Mind tools for managers: 100 ways to be a better boss

The science of intelligent achievement

 

For some, the prospect of giving a presentation can feel something akin to a near-death experience. Indeed, some people will do whatever they can to avoid it.

So the author is to be applauded for his efforts in making presentations feel do-able. There is even a salesperson-style of optimism evident in some parts of the book.

Page 42, for example, suggests a pitch that results in a “no” is merely an unplanned outcome rather than a rejection. But he overlooks alternative approaches to staying optimistic, for instance, considering each rejection as being a step closer to someone saying “yes”, which is arguably more motivational.

In the first half of his work in particular, Mark Rhodes makes good use of established Neuro Linguistic Programming methods to reframe situations and attitudes. He also succeeds in building a sense of confidence as the book progresses, which reflects well on the writer – it makes you feel good as you work through it. The book is likewise peppered with short stories and anecdotes, which keep it entertaining.

Essential skills

But if there is a criticism, it is that there is too much focus on the writer’s experience of making motivational pitches to sales people. The need to know your subject well, be able to answer questions of a technical nature, present to a range of different audiences, understand different cultural issues and offer various types of presentations, are all rich seams, which – if explored - would have given the book a deeper perspective. It would also have been more relevant and useful to a larger number of readers.

To state (on page 169) that if you are unable to answer a question, simply “do a quick Google search on your phone at the break” hints at an ability to bluff rather than ensure you know what you are talking about - and anyone giving a presentation with that advice in mind is treading on thin ice. Still, it probably works at times.

The inclusion of a section on getting paid for making presentations underlines the book’s approach about making presentations for the sake of making presentations. But it overlooks that being able to present is an essential work skill in its own right, and that the challenges involved affect everyone, whether they are paid extra for doing it or not.

Any potential purchasers might be interested to know that additional videos by the author are available on YouTube and that they sometimes cover ground not included in the book – for example, the need to pace things slowly lest you run out of oxygen. Clearly the author, as experienced as he obviously is, is still on a learning curve.

But there is no doubt that this work conveys an element of enthusiasm and excitement, which - without becoming overzealous or righteous – brings a certain freshness to this often overlooked, but essential, skill.

 Mark Northway

Mark Northway is director and courses co-ordinator at Deltic Training, which provides strategic administration and business management courses and accredited qualifications. He is a former director and trustee of the Institute of Administrative Management (IAM), a chief IAM examiner and a Princes Trust Award winner for his role in business mentoring in the UK.

OTHER ARTICLES THAT MAY INTEREST YOU

How to overcome your fear of public speaking

Mind tools for managers: 100 ways to be a better boss

The science of intelligent achievement