The Psychology of Fear in Organisations The Psychology of Fear in Organisations

The Psychology of Fear in Organisations
31 Jul 2015

Fear is rife in organisations. Fuelled largely by the global recession, it has spread like wildfire throughout many organisations and throughout society as a whole.

Fear of job loss, ritual humiliation at work, being excluded and being shamed are regular occurrences in some organisations. Although the recession has eased, fear has changed the psychology of the workforce and the effects of this may well be with us for years to come.

The Psychology of Fear in Organisations explores the emotion of fear within large organisations - how it arises, how it can be recognised and how we can deal with it.

The book covers the climate of fear, how it manifests itself in organizations old and new, large and small, psychological health and wellbeing at work, managing and using fear as a stimulus for creativity and innovation and re-humanising the workplace to deliver a happy, productive, resilient and engaged workforce.

Keegan identifies priorities and practices that foster healthy working environments as well as highlighting the attitudes and practices that don’t - those that result in a demoralised and fearful workforce, leaving people feeling unsupported and scared.

Chris Welford, author of Staying Sane in Business says: “This book is a major contribution to productivity. Why? Because fear is the number one enemy of creativity and without creativity there is no innovation. The anxious mind is rigid and limited as it seeks to solve problems in more or less the same way, time and time again. How can that be good for business?” -

Malcolm Harper from Cranfield University adds: “This book should be read by everyone who has anything to do with managing organisations.”

By Sheila Keegan

About the author

Sheila Keegan presents a rigorous psychological analysis of this phenomenon and shows how fear can be redirected to provide energy to bring about a new wave of creativity and innovation to stimulate business growth.

She is a chartered psychologist and researcher with a doctorate in organisational change and management and writes for a diverse range of publications, from The Sunday Times to Mensa magazine.

Fear is rife in organisations. Fuelled largely by the global recession, it has spread like wildfire throughout many organisations and throughout society as a whole.

Fear of job loss, ritual humiliation at work, being excluded and being shamed are regular occurrences in some organisations. Although the recession has eased, fear has changed the psychology of the workforce and the effects of this may well be with us for years to come.

The Psychology of Fear in Organisations explores the emotion of fear within large organisations - how it arises, how it can be recognised and how we can deal with it.

The book covers the climate of fear, how it manifests itself in organizations old and new, large and small, psychological health and wellbeing at work, managing and using fear as a stimulus for creativity and innovation and re-humanising the workplace to deliver a happy, productive, resilient and engaged workforce.

Keegan identifies priorities and practices that foster healthy working environments as well as highlighting the attitudes and practices that don’t - those that result in a demoralised and fearful workforce, leaving people feeling unsupported and scared.

Chris Welford, author of Staying Sane in Business says: “This book is a major contribution to productivity. Why? Because fear is the number one enemy of creativity and without creativity there is no innovation. The anxious mind is rigid and limited as it seeks to solve problems in more or less the same way, time and time again. How can that be good for business?” -

Malcolm Harper from Cranfield University adds: “This book should be read by everyone who has anything to do with managing organisations.”

By Sheila Keegan

About the author

Sheila Keegan presents a rigorous psychological analysis of this phenomenon and shows how fear can be redirected to provide energy to bring about a new wave of creativity and innovation to stimulate business growth.

She is a chartered psychologist and researcher with a doctorate in organisational change and management and writes for a diverse range of publications, from The Sunday Times to Mensa magazine.