Oracle gender pay gap plaintiffs seek class action status Oracle gender pay gap plaintiffs seek class action status

Oracle gender pay gap plaintiffs seek class action status
30 Jan 2019

US software giant Oracle is being sued for allegedly paying some of its female employees more than US$13,000 less than men in equivalent jobs.

The six plaintiffs in the lawsuit, who are asking for class action status, are seeking to include 4,200 other women who work, or have worked, in the Redwood City firm’s product development, information technology, and support functions, since 2013.

A report by University of California Irvine economist David Neumark on the alleged pay disparity experienced by some women at Oracle was submitted as part of the bid to support the plaintiffs’ bid for class action certification, according to Wired.

Neumark concluded that the difference in compensation was the result of Oracle’s practice of relying on employees’ previous pay when setting initial salaries. Another key difference in earnings between the genders stemmed from bonuses and stock grants, rather than base pay.

Neumark’s report alleged that a female’s base pay was 3.8% less than that of a comparable male’s, while women’s bonuses were, on average, 13.2% less than those of men with the same job codes. For stock grants, the disparity was 33.1%.

Oracle, led by executive chairman Larry Ellison, who is reportedly the 10th richest person on the planet with an estimated worth of $59 billion, declined to comment to Mercury News on the reported pay disparity.

The lawsuit was originally filed in 2017 in San Mateo County Superior Court by engineers Rong Jewett, Sophy Wang and Xian Murray. Three additional plaintiffs joined at a later date.

Search giant Google is fighting a similar lawsuit, despite denying it has any form of gender pay gap, while chip manufacturer Intel has just announced it has eradicated its gender gap too, even when bonuses and stock compensation are taken into account, according to Fortune.

Emma Woollacott

Emma Woollacott is a freelance business journalist. Her work has appeared in a wide range of publications, including the Guardian, the Times, Forbes and the BBC.

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US software giant Oracle is being sued for allegedly paying some of its female employees more than US$13,000 less than men in equivalent jobs.

The six plaintiffs in the lawsuit, who are asking for class action status, are seeking to include 4,200 other women who work, or have worked, in the Redwood City firm’s product development, information technology, and support functions, since 2013.

A report by University of California Irvine economist David Neumark on the alleged pay disparity experienced by some women at Oracle was submitted as part of the bid to support the plaintiffs’ bid for class action certification, according to Wired.

Neumark concluded that the difference in compensation was the result of Oracle’s practice of relying on employees’ previous pay when setting initial salaries. Another key difference in earnings between the genders stemmed from bonuses and stock grants, rather than base pay.

Neumark’s report alleged that a female’s base pay was 3.8% less than that of a comparable male’s, while women’s bonuses were, on average, 13.2% less than those of men with the same job codes. For stock grants, the disparity was 33.1%.

Oracle, led by executive chairman Larry Ellison, who is reportedly the 10th richest person on the planet with an estimated worth of $59 billion, declined to comment to Mercury News on the reported pay disparity.

The lawsuit was originally filed in 2017 in San Mateo County Superior Court by engineers Rong Jewett, Sophy Wang and Xian Murray. Three additional plaintiffs joined at a later date.

Search giant Google is fighting a similar lawsuit, despite denying it has any form of gender pay gap, while chip manufacturer Intel has just announced it has eradicated its gender gap too, even when bonuses and stock compensation are taken into account, according to Fortune.

Emma Woollacott

Emma Woollacott is a freelance business journalist. Her work has appeared in a wide range of publications, including the Guardian, the Times, Forbes and the BBC.

OTHER STORIES THAT MAY INTEREST YOU

UK government responds to gender pay gap reporting recommendations

Iceland first country to mandate gender pay equity

Australia's workplace gender equality agency receives financial boost

 

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