[France] AFP journalists striking over expat job status changes

[France] AFP journalists striking over expat job status changes
11 Jun 2024

On June 9, journalists at Agence France-Presse (AFP) held a 24-hour strike to protest potential changes in the status of journalists working outside France, WhatJobs? reports.

The strike primarily disrupted the French-language production of AFP during a key period for the nation’s domestic news.

Affected coverage reportedly included the 80th anniversary of the D-Day landings, EU elections and an appearance by President Emmanuel Macron.

The strike was called by unions within AFP. It followed a change to a post in Brussels from a "headquarters" contract to a "local" contract, offering less generous housing and social benefits. 

Unions saw the move as part of a broader effort to reduce the number of headquarters-status posts in the agency, which operates in 150 countries. 

A motion voted on by staff read, "The staff demands the maintenance at the current level, i.e. 151 positions, of the network of expatriates with headquarters status in all languages." 

In an internal memo, AFP management reportedly stated its commitment to "maintaining a strong global network with a significant population of expatriate journalists." 

The memo said AFP is unique among global agencies for having such an extensive program, one it believes is highly valuable. 

It did, however, note that rising global taxes and social charges have made sustaining its expatriate network more expensive, making reforms to make the system "fairer and more diverse" necessary. 


Source: WhatJobs?

(Quotes via original reporting)

On June 9, journalists at Agence France-Presse (AFP) held a 24-hour strike to protest potential changes in the status of journalists working outside France, WhatJobs? reports.

The strike primarily disrupted the French-language production of AFP during a key period for the nation’s domestic news.

Affected coverage reportedly included the 80th anniversary of the D-Day landings, EU elections and an appearance by President Emmanuel Macron.

The strike was called by unions within AFP. It followed a change to a post in Brussels from a "headquarters" contract to a "local" contract, offering less generous housing and social benefits. 

Unions saw the move as part of a broader effort to reduce the number of headquarters-status posts in the agency, which operates in 150 countries. 

A motion voted on by staff read, "The staff demands the maintenance at the current level, i.e. 151 positions, of the network of expatriates with headquarters status in all languages." 

In an internal memo, AFP management reportedly stated its commitment to "maintaining a strong global network with a significant population of expatriate journalists." 

The memo said AFP is unique among global agencies for having such an extensive program, one it believes is highly valuable. 

It did, however, note that rising global taxes and social charges have made sustaining its expatriate network more expensive, making reforms to make the system "fairer and more diverse" necessary. 


Source: WhatJobs?

(Quotes via original reporting)

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