[US] Looking at the Americans with Disabilities Act thirty years on [US] Looking at the Americans with Disabilities Act thirty years on

[US] Looking at the Americans with Disabilities Act thirty years on
29 Jul 2020

It has been 30 years since a group of protestors gathered at the base of the US Capitol Building to support the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The ADA was the world’s first significant piece of civil rights legislation for people with disabilities. At the protest, a number of attendees abandoned their assistive devices and crawled up the 78 steps to the Capitol Building to draw attention to the inaccessibility of public spaces. (Links via original reporting)

President Bush signed the ADA into law on July 26, 1990, just a few months after the landmark protest. The stated purpose of the ADA was to guarantee equal opportunity for people with disabilities. Three decades later, The Regulatory Review asks whether the ADA remains an effective tool and looks at how the legislation applies to contemporary issues affecting people with disabilities; including technology, COVID-19 and Criminal Justice Reform. (Links via original reporting)

It has been 30 years since a group of protestors gathered at the base of the US Capitol Building to support the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The ADA was the world’s first significant piece of civil rights legislation for people with disabilities. At the protest, a number of attendees abandoned their assistive devices and crawled up the 78 steps to the Capitol Building to draw attention to the inaccessibility of public spaces. (Links via original reporting)

President Bush signed the ADA into law on July 26, 1990, just a few months after the landmark protest. The stated purpose of the ADA was to guarantee equal opportunity for people with disabilities. Three decades later, The Regulatory Review asks whether the ADA remains an effective tool and looks at how the legislation applies to contemporary issues affecting people with disabilities; including technology, COVID-19 and Criminal Justice Reform. (Links via original reporting)