Canadian government considers taxing robots that take human jobs Canadian government considers taxing robots that take human jobs

Canadian government considers taxing robots that take human jobs
18 Sep 2018

Robots that take the jobs of human workers could soon be liable for tax, while people could also be allowed to pay their tax bills in kind, according to new proposals put before the Canadian government.

The ruling Liberal Party is considering the radical ideas, contained in documents obtained by national news agency The Canadian Press, as part of its efforts to plan ahead for future changes in the workforce resulting from increasing automation and the growing ‘gig economy’, according to CTV News

Experts estimate that up to 15% of Canadian jobs could be lost to automation over the next 20 years, with those most at risk including farm and construction workers, accountants, lab technicians and salespeople. Paramedics, doctors, nurses, teachers, engineers, and journalists are thought to be the least vulnerable.

One of the issues is that workers in the new ‘gig economy’, which includes part-time and short-term contract work, are less likely to pay into the employment insurance system. As a result, government officials are increasingly speaking out about the need to update Canada’s 40 year-old federal labour rules.

Robots that take the jobs of human workers could soon be liable for tax, while people could also be allowed to pay their tax bills in kind, according to new proposals put before the Canadian government.

The ruling Liberal Party is considering the radical ideas, contained in documents obtained by national news agency The Canadian Press, as part of its efforts to plan ahead for future changes in the workforce resulting from increasing automation and the growing ‘gig economy’, according to CTV News

Experts estimate that up to 15% of Canadian jobs could be lost to automation over the next 20 years, with those most at risk including farm and construction workers, accountants, lab technicians and salespeople. Paramedics, doctors, nurses, teachers, engineers, and journalists are thought to be the least vulnerable.

One of the issues is that workers in the new ‘gig economy’, which includes part-time and short-term contract work, are less likely to pay into the employment insurance system. As a result, government officials are increasingly speaking out about the need to update Canada’s 40 year-old federal labour rules.

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