First Minister unveils Scotland’s new Programme for Government First Minister unveils Scotland’s new Programme for Government

First Minister unveils Scotland’s new Programme for Government
05 Sep 2018

Although Scotland’s Programme for Government 2018/19 did not on the surface of it include much that directly affects payroll, some elements will have an impact on individuals and thereby affect their employers.

In addition to the 13 Bills that are already before the Scottish Parliament, the First Minister Nicola Sturgeon indicated that the following 12 Bills  will also be introduced during the rest of this parliamentary year: 

  • Biometric Data Bill;
  • Budget Bill;
  • Census (Amendment) Bill;
  • Consumer Protection Bill;
  • Disclosure Bill;
  • Electoral Franchise Bill;
  • Electoral Reform Bill;
  • Family Law Bill;
  • Female Genital Mutilation Bill;
  • Non-Domestic Rates Bill;
  • Scottish National Investment Bank Bill;
  • South of Scotland Enterprise Agency Bill.

The Budget Bill will directly affect payroll in that it will clarify Scottish Income Tax rates and thresholds. Other announcements worth considering include: 

  • Confirmation that the Student Loan regime is to be given a makeover in two areas:
  1. The Loan threshold will be raised to £25,000 (US$32,020) from April 2021. Loans in Scotland are all collected via payroll through Plan One Loans;
  2. Any Plan One Loan that is not repaid will be written off after 30 years, down from the current 35 years. This change will come into effect towards the end of 2018.
  • An increase of 7,500 in the number of employees receiving the Living Wage as of April 2019 due to more employers being accredited;
  • About 750 “new, extended or refurbished” nurseries being introduced as part of a commitment to double the provision of early learning and childcare for two and three year-olds to 1,140 hours per year from August 2020;
  • An increase in the number of Scottish apprenticeships, which means there will be more possible learning pathways in which employers can use the Flexible Workforce Development Fund

In addition, the First Minister confirmed that new social security agency, Social Security Scotland, would start paying the Carer’s Allowance Supplement as of this month. 

OTHER ARTICLES THAT MAY INTEREST YOU

The UK and crown dependencies: Understanding the tax difference

Glasgow Council boss expects equal pay claim to be settled by year end

The regulatory impact of Scottish devolution

 

Although Scotland’s Programme for Government 2018/19 did not on the surface of it include much that directly affects payroll, some elements will have an impact on individuals and thereby affect their employers.

In addition to the 13 Bills that are already before the Scottish Parliament, the First Minister Nicola Sturgeon indicated that the following 12 Bills  will also be introduced during the rest of this parliamentary year: 

  • Biometric Data Bill;
  • Budget Bill;
  • Census (Amendment) Bill;
  • Consumer Protection Bill;
  • Disclosure Bill;
  • Electoral Franchise Bill;
  • Electoral Reform Bill;
  • Family Law Bill;
  • Female Genital Mutilation Bill;
  • Non-Domestic Rates Bill;
  • Scottish National Investment Bank Bill;
  • South of Scotland Enterprise Agency Bill.

The Budget Bill will directly affect payroll in that it will clarify Scottish Income Tax rates and thresholds. Other announcements worth considering include: 

  • Confirmation that the Student Loan regime is to be given a makeover in two areas:
  1. The Loan threshold will be raised to £25,000 (US$32,020) from April 2021. Loans in Scotland are all collected via payroll through Plan One Loans;
  2. Any Plan One Loan that is not repaid will be written off after 30 years, down from the current 35 years. This change will come into effect towards the end of 2018.
  • An increase of 7,500 in the number of employees receiving the Living Wage as of April 2019 due to more employers being accredited;
  • About 750 “new, extended or refurbished” nurseries being introduced as part of a commitment to double the provision of early learning and childcare for two and three year-olds to 1,140 hours per year from August 2020;
  • An increase in the number of Scottish apprenticeships, which means there will be more possible learning pathways in which employers can use the Flexible Workforce Development Fund

In addition, the First Minister confirmed that new social security agency, Social Security Scotland, would start paying the Carer’s Allowance Supplement as of this month. 

OTHER ARTICLES THAT MAY INTEREST YOU

The UK and crown dependencies: Understanding the tax difference

Glasgow Council boss expects equal pay claim to be settled by year end

The regulatory impact of Scottish devolution

 

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