[Ireland] Steps to end zero-hours contracts [Ireland] Steps to end zero-hours contracts

[Ireland] Steps to end zero-hours contracts
05 Mar 2019

On Monday The Employment (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act came into force in Ireland. The act makes significant changes to employment law in the country for workers on zero-hours or non-secure contracts.

The Irish Examiner reports that the new employment act gives rights and protections to workers without secure contracts. These improvements serve to make insecure working hours more predictable and (with limited exceptions) zero-hour contracts will come to an end. In the first month of employment, employers must now provide five key terms of contract and pay workers for time when work is not available to them.

The Examiner cites a  survey by Peninsula Ireland, an employment law consultancy, which finds that 38% of Irish employers do not know about the legislative change. Despite the new act imposing potential fines of up to €5,000 and/or a year in prison for employers who fail to meet its terms. Corporate employers face individual liability against directors and officers who do not comply.

Recent moves to make changes in the law on gratuities to support service industry workers have met with less success.

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On Monday The Employment (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act came into force in Ireland. The act makes significant changes to employment law in the country for workers on zero-hours or non-secure contracts.

The Irish Examiner reports that the new employment act gives rights and protections to workers without secure contracts. These improvements serve to make insecure working hours more predictable and (with limited exceptions) zero-hour contracts will come to an end. In the first month of employment, employers must now provide five key terms of contract and pay workers for time when work is not available to them.

The Examiner cites a  survey by Peninsula Ireland, an employment law consultancy, which finds that 38% of Irish employers do not know about the legislative change. Despite the new act imposing potential fines of up to €5,000 and/or a year in prison for employers who fail to meet its terms. Corporate employers face individual liability against directors and officers who do not comply.

Recent moves to make changes in the law on gratuities to support service industry workers have met with less success.

OTHER STORIES THAT MAY INTEREST YOU

Irish employers urged to prepare for PAYE revamp

Ireland denies being tax haven despite low tax rates enjoyed by top companies

New PAYE system could see thousands of Irish workers on emergency tax

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