Japan proposes subsidising infant care and education Japan proposes subsidising infant care and education

Japan proposes subsidising infant care and education
19 Jun 2018

The assistance programme is due to come into force in October 2019.

A government panel in Japan is proposing to subsidise families in using uncertified day care, which would result in them receiving free infant care and education.

The panel has suggested offering up to ¥37,000 (US$338) in monthly subsidies to households with children aged between three and five who receive care at facilities other than state-certified nurseries. Municipalities must certify that eligible families require childcare services, according to Japan News. http://the-japan-news.com/news/article/0004479146

The maximum subsidy would be set at ¥42,000 (US$384) for low-income households that are exempted from residential tax and have children aged under two.

The government has already decided https://www.reuters.com/article/us-japan-economy-education/japan-to-spend-around-17-billion-to-subsidize-education-media-idUSKBN1DP03W to make childcare effectively free for children who are under two, from low-income households and attend nurseries that meet state standards. The same applies to all families with children between three and five who attend nurseries that meet state standards, kindergartens or nursery-kindergarten hybrids.

The panel has also proposed moving maximum subsidy levels into line with the national average monthly fees paid at nurseries meeting state standards. The government plans to reflect the panel’s proposals in its basic economic and fiscal policy guidelines, which are due later this month. The assistance programme is expected to be fully launched in October 2019.

Emma Woollacott

Emma Woollacott is a freelance business journalist. Her work has appeared in a wide range of publications, including the Guardian, the Times, Forbes and the BBC.

The assistance programme is due to come into force in October 2019.

A government panel in Japan is proposing to subsidise families in using uncertified day care, which would result in them receiving free infant care and education.

The panel has suggested offering up to ¥37,000 (US$338) in monthly subsidies to households with children aged between three and five who receive care at facilities other than state-certified nurseries. Municipalities must certify that eligible families require childcare services, according to Japan News. http://the-japan-news.com/news/article/0004479146

The maximum subsidy would be set at ¥42,000 (US$384) for low-income households that are exempted from residential tax and have children aged under two.

The government has already decided https://www.reuters.com/article/us-japan-economy-education/japan-to-spend-around-17-billion-to-subsidize-education-media-idUSKBN1DP03W to make childcare effectively free for children who are under two, from low-income households and attend nurseries that meet state standards. The same applies to all families with children between three and five who attend nurseries that meet state standards, kindergartens or nursery-kindergarten hybrids.

The panel has also proposed moving maximum subsidy levels into line with the national average monthly fees paid at nurseries meeting state standards. The government plans to reflect the panel’s proposals in its basic economic and fiscal policy guidelines, which are due later this month. The assistance programme is expected to be fully launched in October 2019.

Emma Woollacott

Emma Woollacott is a freelance business journalist. Her work has appeared in a wide range of publications, including the Guardian, the Times, Forbes and the BBC.

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