Lesotho sanctions huge 62% minimum wage hike for factory workers Lesotho sanctions huge 62% minimum wage hike for factory workers

Lesotho sanctions huge 62% minimum wage hike for factory workers
10 Sep 2018

The Lesotho government has approved a 62% hike in the minimum wage for factory workers, following protests and the threat of strikes at textile plants.

The move will see pay for general workers rise to LSL2,000 (US$138), up from LSL1,238 (US$85), with trained machinists earning more. 

Daniel Theko, general secretary of the Independent Democratic Union of Lesotho, told Just Style: "After sustained pressure, the government addressed our demands exactly the way we wanted. The increase in minimum wages boosts workers' confidence in trade unions. We have been fighting for better wages for many years, and now we know that we have been struggling for a worthy cause." 

Meanwhile it is still unclear whether Nigeria will introduce its new minimum wage structure this month or not as promised, according to the Nation. The 30-member tripartite committee set up by President Muhammadu Buhari to review the situation has not yet completed work on its report as employers have been unable to agree on an appropriate minimum.

The Nigeria Labour Congress and Trade Union Congress, meanwhile, are calling for a leap from 18,000 naira (US$50) to 65,500 (US$182) but are worried by the slow pace of change.

At the inauguration of the minimum wage on 27 November last year, President Bhurai pledged to implement whatever increases were recommended by the review panel in their report, which is due to be submitted this month. But Labour and Employment Minister Chris Ngige recently talked about the possibility of pushing implementation into next year, saying it was no longer feasible to meet the September deadline due to the hurdles being faced by the committee.

Emma Woollacott

Emma Woollacott is a freelance business journalist. Her work has appeared in a wide range of publications, including the Guardian, the Times, Forbes and the BBC.

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The Lesotho government has approved a 62% hike in the minimum wage for factory workers, following protests and the threat of strikes at textile plants.

The move will see pay for general workers rise to LSL2,000 (US$138), up from LSL1,238 (US$85), with trained machinists earning more. 

Daniel Theko, general secretary of the Independent Democratic Union of Lesotho, told Just Style: "After sustained pressure, the government addressed our demands exactly the way we wanted. The increase in minimum wages boosts workers' confidence in trade unions. We have been fighting for better wages for many years, and now we know that we have been struggling for a worthy cause." 

Meanwhile it is still unclear whether Nigeria will introduce its new minimum wage structure this month or not as promised, according to the Nation. The 30-member tripartite committee set up by President Muhammadu Buhari to review the situation has not yet completed work on its report as employers have been unable to agree on an appropriate minimum.

The Nigeria Labour Congress and Trade Union Congress, meanwhile, are calling for a leap from 18,000 naira (US$50) to 65,500 (US$182) but are worried by the slow pace of change.

At the inauguration of the minimum wage on 27 November last year, President Bhurai pledged to implement whatever increases were recommended by the review panel in their report, which is due to be submitted this month. But Labour and Employment Minister Chris Ngige recently talked about the possibility of pushing implementation into next year, saying it was no longer feasible to meet the September deadline due to the hurdles being faced by the committee.

Emma Woollacott

Emma Woollacott is a freelance business journalist. Her work has appeared in a wide range of publications, including the Guardian, the Times, Forbes and the BBC.

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Minding your manners in Africa

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