New European Labour Authority to boost fair movement of workers New European Labour Authority to boost fair movement of workers

New European Labour Authority to boost fair movement of workers
23 Mar 2018

The European Commission has proposed setting up both a European Labour Authority and an initiative to ensure all workers and self-employed people have access to social benefits and protection.

The European Labour Authority is intended to ensure fair labour mobility and help individuals, businesses and national administrations get the most out of the opportunities offered by the principle of free movement within the European Union (EU) trade bloc. Over the last decade, the number of people living and/or working in other member states has almost doubled, reaching 17 million in 2017.

Marianne Thyssen, commissioner for employment, social affairs, skills and labour mobility, said: "Our work to ensure fair labour mobility culminates in this proposal for a European Labour Authority. This is essential for a well-functioning European labour market. It will help citizens and businesses on the move find the right information and strengthen cooperation between the member states to enforce fair and effective rules."

The Commission is also working with member states to provide citizens with access to social protection and “adequate benefits no matter how the new world of work evolves”, with the aim of ensuring that “nobody is left behind”, she added.

The Labour Authority will provide information to employers and citizens about opportunities for jobs, apprenticeships, mobility schemes, recruitment and training. It will likewise offer them guidance on their rights and obligations when living, working and/or operating in other EU member states.

Cooperation between national authorities in cross-border situations will be supported by providing easy-to-follow guidelines on how to adhere to EU rules that protect and regulate mobility. Finally, the Authority will provide mediation in the case of cross-border disputes, for example, if a company’s restructuring activity involves several member states. Following completion of the EU legislative process, the new decentralised EU agency should be up and running in 2019.

The Commission is also proposing a Council Recommendation on providing access to social protection for workers and the self-employed. The Recommendation aims to:

  • Close formal coverage gaps by ensuring that workers and the self-employed can, in comparable circumstances, use corresponding social security systems;
  • Offer them adequate coverage so they can build up and claim benefit entitlements;
  • Make it easier to transfer social security entitlements from one job to the next; and
  • Provide workers and the self-employed with transparent information about their social security entitlements and obligations.

 Emma Woollacott

Emma Woollacott is a freelance business journalist. Her work has appeared in a wide range of publications, including the Guardian, the Times, Forbes and the BBC.

 

The European Commission has proposed setting up both a European Labour Authority and an initiative to ensure all workers and self-employed people have access to social benefits and protection.

The European Labour Authority is intended to ensure fair labour mobility and help individuals, businesses and national administrations get the most out of the opportunities offered by the principle of free movement within the European Union (EU) trade bloc. Over the last decade, the number of people living and/or working in other member states has almost doubled, reaching 17 million in 2017.

Marianne Thyssen, commissioner for employment, social affairs, skills and labour mobility, said: "Our work to ensure fair labour mobility culminates in this proposal for a European Labour Authority. This is essential for a well-functioning European labour market. It will help citizens and businesses on the move find the right information and strengthen cooperation between the member states to enforce fair and effective rules."

The Commission is also working with member states to provide citizens with access to social protection and “adequate benefits no matter how the new world of work evolves”, with the aim of ensuring that “nobody is left behind”, she added.

The Labour Authority will provide information to employers and citizens about opportunities for jobs, apprenticeships, mobility schemes, recruitment and training. It will likewise offer them guidance on their rights and obligations when living, working and/or operating in other EU member states.

Cooperation between national authorities in cross-border situations will be supported by providing easy-to-follow guidelines on how to adhere to EU rules that protect and regulate mobility. Finally, the Authority will provide mediation in the case of cross-border disputes, for example, if a company’s restructuring activity involves several member states. Following completion of the EU legislative process, the new decentralised EU agency should be up and running in 2019.

The Commission is also proposing a Council Recommendation on providing access to social protection for workers and the self-employed. The Recommendation aims to:

  • Close formal coverage gaps by ensuring that workers and the self-employed can, in comparable circumstances, use corresponding social security systems;
  • Offer them adequate coverage so they can build up and claim benefit entitlements;
  • Make it easier to transfer social security entitlements from one job to the next; and
  • Provide workers and the self-employed with transparent information about their social security entitlements and obligations.

 Emma Woollacott

Emma Woollacott is a freelance business journalist. Her work has appeared in a wide range of publications, including the Guardian, the Times, Forbes and the BBC.

 

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