Posted EU workers given same working conditions as native staff Posted EU workers given same working conditions as native staff

Posted EU workers given same working conditions as native staff
05 Jun 2018

The European Parliament has approved rules requiring European Union (EU) employers to give workers, who are temporarily sent to other member states, similar working conditions to native staff.

The amendments to existing laws will entitle temporary overseas workers to the same minimum pay as those in the host country. They will likewise be able to take advantage of any large regional or sector-specific collective wage agreements that are currently in force.

Employers will also be required to pay for travel, board and accommodation rather than deducting such costs from wages. They must likewise ensure that accommodation meets local standards. Postings will be limited to 12 months, with the possibility of a six-month extension.

Keith Williams, partner in the employment law team at Greenwoods GRM, told People Management that the rule change was “good news, as it levels the playing field for international competition by closing a loophole which was enabling the exploitation of potentially vulnerable workers”.

Member states have two years to enforce the rules. According to the European Parliament, there were 2.6m posted workers in the EU in 2016.

 Emma Woollacott

Emma Woollacott is a freelance business journalist. Her work has appeared in a wide range of publications, including the Guardian, the Times, Forbes and the BBC.

The European Parliament has approved rules requiring European Union (EU) employers to give workers, who are temporarily sent to other member states, similar working conditions to native staff.

The amendments to existing laws will entitle temporary overseas workers to the same minimum pay as those in the host country. They will likewise be able to take advantage of any large regional or sector-specific collective wage agreements that are currently in force.

Employers will also be required to pay for travel, board and accommodation rather than deducting such costs from wages. They must likewise ensure that accommodation meets local standards. Postings will be limited to 12 months, with the possibility of a six-month extension.

Keith Williams, partner in the employment law team at Greenwoods GRM, told People Management that the rule change was “good news, as it levels the playing field for international competition by closing a loophole which was enabling the exploitation of potentially vulnerable workers”.

Member states have two years to enforce the rules. According to the European Parliament, there were 2.6m posted workers in the EU in 2016.

 Emma Woollacott

Emma Woollacott is a freelance business journalist. Her work has appeared in a wide range of publications, including the Guardian, the Times, Forbes and the BBC.

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