President Macron promises French protestors to up minimum wage President Macron promises French protestors to up minimum wage

President Macron promises French protestors to up minimum wage
18 Dec 2018

In a bid to appease the 'gilets jaune' protestors, French President Emmanuel Macron has promised that his government will increase the minimum wage.

He has also pledged to cancel a planned social security tax hike for pensioners earning less than €2,000 (US$2,272) and not to tax overtime working from 2019. But the President refused to reinstate a tax on the wealthy, stating that “this would weaken us, we need to create jobs”.

According to WIC News, Macron also said his government would ask private employers to pay their workers year-end bonuses if they are able.

In a televised speech, the President indicated the minimum wage would rise by €100 (US$113) per month without any additional cost to employers. He acknowledged the protesters’ anger and indignation was “deep, and in many ways legitimate”, but added “no anger justifies attacking a police officer, a gendarme or damaging a shop or public building”.

Nearly 2,000 people have so far been arrested during the protests over fuel price hikes, the rising cost of living and stagnant wages, i News reported. Although the majority of protests were peaceful, a number of people did suffer casualties during the riots.

Emma Woollacott

Emma Woollacott is a freelance business journalist. Her work has appeared in a wide range of publications, including the Guardian, the Times, Forbes and the BBC.

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In a bid to appease the 'gilets jaune' protestors, French President Emmanuel Macron has promised that his government will increase the minimum wage.

He has also pledged to cancel a planned social security tax hike for pensioners earning less than €2,000 (US$2,272) and not to tax overtime working from 2019. But the President refused to reinstate a tax on the wealthy, stating that “this would weaken us, we need to create jobs”.

According to WIC News, Macron also said his government would ask private employers to pay their workers year-end bonuses if they are able.

In a televised speech, the President indicated the minimum wage would rise by €100 (US$113) per month without any additional cost to employers. He acknowledged the protesters’ anger and indignation was “deep, and in many ways legitimate”, but added “no anger justifies attacking a police officer, a gendarme or damaging a shop or public building”.

Nearly 2,000 people have so far been arrested during the protests over fuel price hikes, the rising cost of living and stagnant wages, i News reported. Although the majority of protests were peaceful, a number of people did suffer casualties during the riots.

Emma Woollacott

Emma Woollacott is a freelance business journalist. Her work has appeared in a wide range of publications, including the Guardian, the Times, Forbes and the BBC.

OTHER STORIES THAT MAY INTEREST YOU

Spotlight on payroll in France

Ten things to bear in mind when setting up shop in France

A checklist to prepare for France's new PAYE system

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