What will citizens do if the UK leaves the EU? What will citizens do if the UK leaves the EU?

What will citizens do if the UK leaves the EU?
30 Apr 2014

18-34 year old Brits were asked their views on ‘Brexit’ and what they would do if the UK leaves the EU. What makes this survey different from the others is the question being asked – not how will you vote, but what will you do if Britain does decide to leave the EU? The results are intriguing.

• 15.4% of young Brits would consider emigration if the UK quits EU, which would result in more than 2 million people leaving the UK (calculated using ONS statistics).

• Nearly a third (32%) of 18-34 year-olds in the North East of England would also consider leaving the UK.

• Northern Irish are more likely to give up on the UK if Britain votes to leave the EU as 23.8% of 18-34 year-olds polled say they would consider emigration

Would you consider emigrating if the UK votes to leave the EU?

15.4% of respondents answered yes, equating to more than 2 million working age Brits considering emigrating if the UK leaves the EU. Despite the fact that emigration involves massive upheaval, only just over half (56.7%) of the young people surveyed answered with a categorical ‘no’.

Almost a third (27.8%) said that they would prefer not to say at this stage, leaving open the possibility that Britain could face a dramatic ‘brain drain’ were the decision made to leave the EU, with 43.2 per cent of people open to the idea of emigration.

The biggest losses would come from males aged 18-24, over 18% of whom said they would consider leaving the UK in light of Brexit meaning that we would face a pronounced skills shortage both now and in the years ahead.

Geographical view points

One of the most interesting aspects of the survey is the change in views according to geography. In England and Wales more than half of all survey respondents in each country (56.9% and 66.7 respectively) said that they would be happy in a UK outside of the EU. While in Scotland over a third (37%) preferred not to say.

The most striking result came from Northern Ireland however, where a massive 23% per cent of 18-34 year-olds said that they would seriously consider emigration in the event of a ‘leave’ vote. When broken down by gender, 42% of Northern Irish females would consider emigration.

In the North East of England nearly a third (32%) of respondents said they would view leaving the UK as an option if we left the EU.

The statistic

Over 1100 British adults ages between 18 and 34 in February and March 2016 were surveyed.

There are 14,632,713 18-34 year-olds in the UK which means that based on the poll 2,253,438 i.e. 15.4% considering emigration.

So what does this mean for the UK’s workforce? We know there is a high instance of unemployment in this age group and so it’s understandable that many are disillusioned but how will this hit employers if these young people were to leave? The potential impact won’t just be immediate but have long-term implications. Yet more considerations in the Brexit conundrum.

Chris Meredith CEO, Officebroker.

18-34 year old Brits were asked their views on ‘Brexit’ and what they would do if the UK leaves the EU. What makes this survey different from the others is the question being asked – not how will you vote, but what will you do if Britain does decide to leave the EU? The results are intriguing.

• 15.4% of young Brits would consider emigration if the UK quits EU, which would result in more than 2 million people leaving the UK (calculated using ONS statistics).

• Nearly a third (32%) of 18-34 year-olds in the North East of England would also consider leaving the UK.

• Northern Irish are more likely to give up on the UK if Britain votes to leave the EU as 23.8% of 18-34 year-olds polled say they would consider emigration

Would you consider emigrating if the UK votes to leave the EU?

15.4% of respondents answered yes, equating to more than 2 million working age Brits considering emigrating if the UK leaves the EU. Despite the fact that emigration involves massive upheaval, only just over half (56.7%) of the young people surveyed answered with a categorical ‘no’.

Almost a third (27.8%) said that they would prefer not to say at this stage, leaving open the possibility that Britain could face a dramatic ‘brain drain’ were the decision made to leave the EU, with 43.2 per cent of people open to the idea of emigration.

The biggest losses would come from males aged 18-24, over 18% of whom said they would consider leaving the UK in light of Brexit meaning that we would face a pronounced skills shortage both now and in the years ahead.

Geographical view points

One of the most interesting aspects of the survey is the change in views according to geography. In England and Wales more than half of all survey respondents in each country (56.9% and 66.7 respectively) said that they would be happy in a UK outside of the EU. While in Scotland over a third (37%) preferred not to say.

The most striking result came from Northern Ireland however, where a massive 23% per cent of 18-34 year-olds said that they would seriously consider emigration in the event of a ‘leave’ vote. When broken down by gender, 42% of Northern Irish females would consider emigration.

In the North East of England nearly a third (32%) of respondents said they would view leaving the UK as an option if we left the EU.

The statistic

Over 1100 British adults ages between 18 and 34 in February and March 2016 were surveyed.

There are 14,632,713 18-34 year-olds in the UK which means that based on the poll 2,253,438 i.e. 15.4% considering emigration.

So what does this mean for the UK’s workforce? We know there is a high instance of unemployment in this age group and so it’s understandable that many are disillusioned but how will this hit employers if these young people were to leave? The potential impact won’t just be immediate but have long-term implications. Yet more considerations in the Brexit conundrum.

Chris Meredith CEO, Officebroker.

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