Four steps to convert a LinkedIn prospect into a new client Four steps to convert a LinkedIn prospect into a new client

Four steps to convert a LinkedIn prospect into a new client
31 Dec 2014

In my last blog on creating prospects on LinkedIn that become new clients I shared the early stage LinkedIn relationship building techniques I have employed to grow my business from a standing start to one that now works with major corporate businesses in the UK and Europe 

Last time we examined the early stages of the relationship on LinkedIn - the invitation to connect, the first response and the importance of getting these right. This month I want to help you put in place the next piece of the jigsaw and explore how you take this warm lead and turn them into a raving fan.

In the last issue, I explained how to send a tailored invitation to connect and back this up with a nice, softly-softly response offering something of value for free. Now it’s time to step the game.

What will your next content message include?

If you want to continue to build a professional business relationship with your new LinkedIn connection then it is important that you continue to send them information that is relevant to their industry. This could be in the form of a client case study, a slide presentation, an industry related blog, in fact anything which will be perceived as being of value.

Most importantly, it should not include specific details of your payroll services or any other blatant promotional content, certainly not this early in the relationship. 

Imagine for a moment that you and I have connected on LinkedIn. Suppose I’d taken the trouble to view your profile in depth, perhaps I’d checked out your activity feed and got to understand your views on certain industry related topics. What if I then sent you information that either supports your views or provides additional research, data, or information of any kind that you maybe have not heard about previously. Would this be useful to you?

Social selling takes time and it requires you to take a genuine interest in your prospect. Social selling of this nature is not about mass marketing, it’s about nurture, nurturing the key prospects who could become your next biggest client and change your business, possibly forever.

The third LinkedIn follow up message in the sequence, should not only offer your new connection something of value and for free again, it should now begin to direct your prospect toward your den. What is your den, I hear you ask? It’s your marketing funnel, your website capture page, whatever it is you use to then be able to market directly to your LinkedIn prospect.

Here are the key takeaways from this third message:

• The heading includes the recipient’s name and a call to action
• The first offer is well researched and genuinely of value
• The call to action (the webinar) is encouraging more direct engagement with my business
• Always include a PS to remind them that you’d value a response and therefore, further engagement.

How long does this relationship building process continue for?

Well, it is definitely a case of ‘how long is a piece of string?’ It will take as long as it takes for you to build know, like and trust with your LinkedIn connections. I can’t be any more precise than that, other than to say that you’ll know from the level of engagement you receive in reply, when it’s time to pick up the phone, give them a call and suggest a meeting.

Take time to build relationships online and the selling part will become so much easier. Create a content messaging strategy that you can easily copy and paste and which requires only minimal time to edit to ensure its relevance to specific market sectors, companies or individuals.

Make sure that your payroll business is the one that stands out from the crowd by providing value first before attempting to sell.

By Steve Phillip

In my last blog on creating prospects on LinkedIn that become new clients I shared the early stage LinkedIn relationship building techniques I have employed to grow my business from a standing start to one that now works with major corporate businesses in the UK and Europe 

Last time we examined the early stages of the relationship on LinkedIn - the invitation to connect, the first response and the importance of getting these right. This month I want to help you put in place the next piece of the jigsaw and explore how you take this warm lead and turn them into a raving fan.

In the last issue, I explained how to send a tailored invitation to connect and back this up with a nice, softly-softly response offering something of value for free. Now it’s time to step the game.

What will your next content message include?

If you want to continue to build a professional business relationship with your new LinkedIn connection then it is important that you continue to send them information that is relevant to their industry. This could be in the form of a client case study, a slide presentation, an industry related blog, in fact anything which will be perceived as being of value.

Most importantly, it should not include specific details of your payroll services or any other blatant promotional content, certainly not this early in the relationship. 

Imagine for a moment that you and I have connected on LinkedIn. Suppose I’d taken the trouble to view your profile in depth, perhaps I’d checked out your activity feed and got to understand your views on certain industry related topics. What if I then sent you information that either supports your views or provides additional research, data, or information of any kind that you maybe have not heard about previously. Would this be useful to you?

Social selling takes time and it requires you to take a genuine interest in your prospect. Social selling of this nature is not about mass marketing, it’s about nurture, nurturing the key prospects who could become your next biggest client and change your business, possibly forever.

The third LinkedIn follow up message in the sequence, should not only offer your new connection something of value and for free again, it should now begin to direct your prospect toward your den. What is your den, I hear you ask? It’s your marketing funnel, your website capture page, whatever it is you use to then be able to market directly to your LinkedIn prospect.

Here are the key takeaways from this third message:

• The heading includes the recipient’s name and a call to action
• The first offer is well researched and genuinely of value
• The call to action (the webinar) is encouraging more direct engagement with my business
• Always include a PS to remind them that you’d value a response and therefore, further engagement.

How long does this relationship building process continue for?

Well, it is definitely a case of ‘how long is a piece of string?’ It will take as long as it takes for you to build know, like and trust with your LinkedIn connections. I can’t be any more precise than that, other than to say that you’ll know from the level of engagement you receive in reply, when it’s time to pick up the phone, give them a call and suggest a meeting.

Take time to build relationships online and the selling part will become so much easier. Create a content messaging strategy that you can easily copy and paste and which requires only minimal time to edit to ensure its relevance to specific market sectors, companies or individuals.

Make sure that your payroll business is the one that stands out from the crowd by providing value first before attempting to sell.

By Steve Phillip